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Business

The Design Ecology of Work

In a previous book- The Fifth Age of Work- I began with a simple but perhaps odd question: What would HR in a company look like if a designer were put in charge? I tried to answer that question as best as I could, but I think

The Economics of In-Firm Coworking

As I have suggested recently, the key drivers behind the growth of corporate coworking have been for the most part real estate drivers. The economics of this simply make sense, despite the skeptics. If one looks only narrowly at the price per square foot for a

Corporate Coworking: On Campus or 3rd Party?

Twenty five percent of WeWork's members are 'corporate coworkers,' and the company now boasts that 22% of the Fortune 500 companies have employees who work in their spaces. At the current rate of growth, some 40-50% of coworking members will be corporate users within five to seven years.

Coworking in a Holistic Perspective

As long-standing participants in the coworking industry, the partners at OpenWork Agency have seen the industry evolve since the beginning. What was once a social movement is now a sure enough industry. Depending on what your vantage point is, though, coworking is different things to

Coworking and Company Culture

Marc Andreessen once famously said that 'software is eating the world,' and that if your business can't be boiled down to a simple (software) solution it probably doesn't have much of a chance. Or at least, in his world of venture investing, if your startup

Enterprise Coworking

It was recently announced that WeWork, the global coworking chain, has signed a deal to manage an entire office building for IBM in Manhattan. Up to 800 employees will work in the building, which WeWork will manage as a single shared office environment.  At first

Workplace Strategy: Coworking for company employees

Why/how does coworking work for company teams? Data demonstrate that engaged employees are more productive employees than their disengaged counterparts, and the data on employee engagement is abysmal.  According to a 2014 Gallup poll, less than one-third (31.5%) of U.S. workers were actively engaged in their